CONTACT

Andrew@andrewlampert.com

BIO

Born in the mid-70s in the Midwest, Andrew Lampert has created an extensive body of films, videos, photographs and performances since the late 1990s. His work is regularly exhibited in a variety of contexts around the world at venues including: The Whitney Museum of American Art; The Getty Museum; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; The Art Gallery of Ontario; The International Film Festival Rotterdam; The Toronto Film Festival; The New York Film Festival; The San Francisco International Film Festival, The Viennalle, Austria; Visual Arts Center, University of Texas at Austin; The International Short Film Festival Oberhausen; The Drawing Center, NYC; Mitchell Algus Gallery, NYC; PS1/MoMA; The Kitchen; The Center for Contemporary Art, Glasgow, Visual Art Center at the University of Texas at Austin, The Images Festival; Issue Project Room, NYC; Pacific Film Archive/Berkeley Art Museum; Aurora Picture Show, Houston; The Gene Siskel Film Center, Chicago, and elsewhere

Lampert lives in Brooklyn. As Archivist and later Curator of Collections at Anthology Film Archives from 2003-2015 he was responsible for directing the archive, preserving the film and video collections, and co-programming public screenings. He has been a Visiting Lecturer in the School of Film and Media Studies at Purchase College and taught at the Eugene Lang College at the New School. Over the years he has served as a visiting artist and guest teacher at schools including: New York University, Yale University MFA program, Bard College, Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, Pratt College, University of Texas at Austin, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Massachusetts College of Art, Oslo National Academy of Arts, FAMU (Prague), York University along with many others.

Selected videos by Andrew Lampert are available from Electronic Arts Intermix.

ARTIST STATEMENT

I enjoy going to the big movie multiplexes and noting their mistakes. Perfect misframing after a bad splice, the long minutes it takes for the popcorn boy to amble from the floor to the booth so that he can adjust the image. Soft focus and booming sound, or the complete lack thereof. Delinquent reels projected out of order, sometimes discernible tho far better when sublime confusion fashions new narratives and non-linear relationships. Space and time. The time it takes to fix a mistake and the physical space occupied between the projector, the projectionist, the audience and the screen. This is cinematic. 

Which is to say the projector and the screen and the projectionist and the audience are together far more integral to cinema than any film running through a projector in a booth behind the audience, operated by a projectionist who beams light above heads and onto the screen. What we watch in the cinema, you can call it content, is interchangeable. Movies eventually resemble movies, some singular while most remembered as being this genre or that, starring or made by someone, so and so meets so and so. Celluloid is not cinema, not even close. So what does expanding cinema mean? Bigger audiences? At the multiplex maybe, but for us (if you have read this far you are one of us) expanded indicates multiple projectors, numerous means. Simultaneity and synchronicity, or the complete lack there of. Space and time.
 

 

 

SELECTED WRITINGS ON AND ABOUT

  • JOHN KLACSMANN & ANDREW LAMPERT ON HARRY SMITH, 'PAPER AIRPLANES' & 'STRING FIGURES' by Madeline Weisburg, Artbook.com, December 04, 2015
  • FLYING DREAMS > SEX by Gareth Tobago, Flaunt Magazine, December 02, 2015
  • ON PAPER AIRPLANES: THE COLLECTIONS OF HARRY SMITH by Sophie Butcher, Aperture.org,    November 25, 2015
  • WHAT'S WITH ALL THE PAPER PLANES by Mandi Kieghran, N FOR NORWEGIAN, November 2015
  • THE LAST PICTURE SHOW? THE SURVIVAL OF FILM IN THE DIGITAL AGE by Amy Taubin, ArtForum, October 2015
  • FESTIVALS: MIGRATING FORMS by Giampaolo Bianconi, in Film Comment, January 10, 2014
  • UNESSENTIAL CINEMA: AN INTERVIEW WITH ANDREW LAMPERT by Joel Schlemowitz, in The Moving Image, in The Moving Image, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2012
  • A FRAME-BY-FRAME SHOW-AND-TELL, by Andy Battaglia, in The Wall Street JournalT, Jan 14, 2012
  • ANDREW LAMPERT by Ed Halter, Bomb, Issue 112, Summer 2010
  • POWERS OF PROJECTION by Ed Halter, ArtForum, January 2010
  • YEAR IN FILM: CULTURE HIGH by Eric Hynes, Village Voice, December 22, 2010
  • BEST OF THE DECADE: AVANT-GARDEFilm Comment, 2009
  • THOSE OF US WHO KNOW ABOUT THESE DARKENED ROOMS, AND GO THERE ... by Jacob Korczynski, C Magazine, Spring 2009
  • ROBERT DOWNEY'S NO-BUDGET GENIUS by Bruce Bennett, in The Wall Street Journal, September 9, 2008
  • THE RESURRECTION OF A RENEGADE’S SCOTCH-TAPE FILMS by Stuart Klawans, in The New York Times, August 29, 2008
  • WHOSE WEDDING by Charles Graeber, in The New Yorker, August 6, 2007
  • HOME MOVIE MEMORIES by Gary Shapiro, in New York Sun, August 14, 2006
  • A FOLD IN THE FABRIC  Catalogue, LMAK Projects, 2006
  • SECRETS IN THE ARCHIVES: HIDDEN STORIES, NECESSARY RELEASES by Melinda Stone, in A Closer Look/Hidden Histories, San Francisco: National Alliance for Media Arts & Culture, 2005.
  • BEST OF 2005 by Debra Singer, in ArtForum, December 2005
  • REEL PEOPLE by Emily Pugh, in Stay Free, Issue 23, 2005
  • YOU ARE HERE by Belinda Baldwin, in The Independent, October 2004
  • THINKING OUTSIDE THE CAGE: SOUNDS WITH AND AGAINST IMAGE by Alan Licht, in Village Voice, January 21-27, 2004
  • ALL CAGE, ALL THE TIME (WITH A BIT OF MERCE, NAM JUNE, SHIGEKO AND CHARLOTTE) by Ellen Pearlman, in The Brooklyn Rail, March 2004
  • LOWLY HOME MOVIES GET A DAY AS HIGH ART by Lawrence Levi, inThe New York Times, August 18, 2003
  • BEYOND THE FRIEDMANS by Matt Zoller Seitz, in New York Press, Vol.16, No.23, August 13-19. 2003
  • AVANT-GARDE FILM JOURNAL by Brian Frye, in Millennium Film Journal Nos. 39/40, Winter 2003
  • THE NEW YORK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL, AND THE UNDERGROUND IN GENERAL by Mike Plante, in Cinemad, Issue Five, 2001